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Carrot Cake Recipe

Although we have come to regard this cake as being of American-Jewish origins, there are records of it being popular in Britain in the 16th century, and a cake of this type is probably much older - carrots providing the sweet aspect in cakes, when sugar wouldn't have been available.

Whatever its origins, it's now very popular in Britain, particularly with vegetarians. The almonds can be replaced by the same quantity of ground rice and a half-teaspoon (no more) of almond essence (not flavour) without anyone noticing!

Key Features

  • Suitable for Vegetarians

Ingredients

- 1 teaspoon/5mg Butter

- 6 medium Eggs, separated, into yolks & whites

- 4 oz/120gr Caster Sugar

- 1 lb/500gr old Carrots, peeled, cooked & puréed (new-season carrots will little flavour)

- The zest from two Oranges - avoiding the pith

- 1 tablespoon (15ml) Brandy (optional)

- 12 oz/360gr Ground Almonds

Equipment needed:

1 x 12 ins/24cm loose-bottomed cake tin - either non-stick, or lined with silicon/Bakewell paper. A food processor. A grater.

Method

- Preheat an oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas 4.

- Lightly-grease the cake tin with butter, if it's not non-stick, it's wise to line it with silicon-type paper.

- Beat the egg yolks until they start to thicken.

- Slowly add the sugar and continue beating. The mixture should become creamy.

- Blend in the remaining ingredients - except the egg whites.

- In an absolutely-dry bowl, beat the egg whites until they form peaks.

- Fold, rather than beat, these into the carrot mixture.

- Pour this mixture into the prepared cake tin, and bake in the oven for 90 minutes, or until a skewer or sharp knife inserted in the centre, comes out clean. If the knife comes out marked, cook for a further 5-6 minutes.

- Leave the cake to cool a little, then turn it out, and cool further - preferably on a wire rack, so it doesn't sweat at the bottom.

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